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Microinverters

What is a solar microinverter?

A solar microinverter is a device used in solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to convert the direct current (DC) generated by solar panels into alternating current (AC) that can be used to power devices and the conventional power grid. Unlike traditional solar inverters, which are typically single-point inverters for the entire solar panel system, microinverters are installed individually on each solar panel or on small groups of panels.

Microinverters

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ENPHASE Microinverter IQ7X

€151.85

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ7X

Microinverter compatible with solar panels of 60, 66 and 72 cells, up to 460W and 58V. Microinverter up to 96.5% energy efficiency. ENPHASE microinverters are high-performance elements, specially designed to be connected to the electricity grid. Ideal to manage your facilities either for residential use or for small businesses.

ENPHASE microinverters are reliable and safe, making them an excellent choice for your solar installation.

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ENPHASE Microinverter IQ8AC

€181.50

The IQ8AC microinverters are designed to match the latest generation of high-efficiency PV modules. It is the most reliable microinverter offering the highest power output in the industry, and its quick shutdown feature ensures that it meets the strictest safety standards. They are CE certified. 25-year warranty.

  • On sale!

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ7PLUS

€137.53

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ7PLUS

Microinverter compatible with solar panels of 60 and 72 cells, up to 440W and 60V. Microinverter up to 96.5% energy efficiency. ENPHASE microinverters are high-performance elements, specially designed to be connected to the electricity grid. Ideal to manage your facilities either for residential use or for small businesses.

ENPHASE microinverters are reliable and safe, making them an excellent choice for your solar installation.

  • On sale!

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ7A

€166.49

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ7A

Microinverter compatible with solar panels of 60, 66 and 72 cells, up to 460W and 58V. Microinverter up to 96.5% energy efficiency. ENPHASE microinverters are high-performance elements, specially designed to be connected to the electricity grid. Ideal to manage your facilities either for residential use or for small businesses.

ENPHASE microinverters are reliable and safe, making them an excellent choice for your solar installation.

  • On sale!

DEYE Microinverter SUN600G3

€235.40

DEYE Microinverter SUN600 G3

Microinverter compatible with solar panels of 60, 66 and 72 cells, up to 400W and 60V. Microinverter up to 96.5% energy efficiency. DEYE microinverters are high-performance elements, specially designed to be connected to the electricity grid. Ideal to manage your facilities either for residential use or for small businesses. This microinverter may control up to 2 solar panels.

DEYE microinverters are reliable and safe, making them an excellent choice for your solar installation.

  • On sale!

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ8HC

€177.97

ENPHASE Microinverter IQ8HC

Microinverter compatible with solar panels of 54, 60, 66 and 72 cells, up to 560W and 60V. Microinverter up to 96.8% energy efficiency. ENPHASE microinverters are high-performance elements, specially designed to be connected to the electricity grid. Ideal to manage your facilities either for residential use or for small businesses.

ENPHASE microinverters are reliable and safe, making them an excellent choice for your solar installation.

What is a solar microinverter, in detail?

A solar microinverter is a device used in solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that has the function of converting the direct current (DC) generated by the solar panels into alternating current (AC) which is the form of electricity used in homes and the conventional power grid. Unlike traditional solar inverters, which are used in larger solar systems and convert direct current from the entire array of panels, microinverters are installed individually on each solar panel or in small groups of panels. Here is a more detailed description of how they work:

- Individual installation: Each solar panel in a system equipped with microinverters has its own microinverter connected directly to it. This means that, instead of a single central inverter for the entire system, there are multiple microinverters distributed on the roof or in the location where the solar panels are installed.

- DC to AC conversion: When solar panels generate electricity, they produce direct current (DC), which is a form of electricity that cannot be used directly by most devices and the household grid. Microinverters are designed to convert this DC into alternating current (AC), which is the form of electricity that is used in homes and can be fed into the grid.

- Performance optimisation: A key benefit of microinverters is that they optimise the performance of each solar panel individually. This means that each panel operates at its maximum capacity, regardless of shading or wear and tear that other panels in the system may experience. In contrast, a single central inverter in a traditional system can be affected by the poorer performance of a single panel.

- Real-time monitoring: Microinverters are often equipped with monitoring systems that allow solar system owners to track the performance of each solar panel individually and in real time. This makes it easier to detect problems and perform maintenance more efficiently.

- Safety: Microinverters are generally safer in terms of automatic shutdown in case of electrical or safety problems. Because they are connected to each panel, they can independently switch off the panels in the event of a problem, reducing the risk of fire or electric shock.

In short, a solar microinverter is a device that is installed on each solar panel or small groups of panels to convert the direct current they generate into usable alternating current. This technology optimises system performance, facilitates monitoring and increases safety compared to traditional solar inverters.

What are the advantages of a solar microinverter?

The main advantage of microinverters is that they optimise the performance of the solar system at the level of each panel or group of panels, rather than at the level of the entire system as traditional inverters do. This means that if one panel is shaded or malfunctioning, it will not affect the energy production of the entire system, as each panel has its own microinverter. In addition, microinverters allow real-time monitoring of the performance of each solar panel, which facilitates troubleshooting and maintenance.

Some key advantages of solar microinverters include:

  • - Increased efficiency: Microinverters optimise energy production at the panel level, which can increase overall system efficiency.
  • - Increased durability: By distributing the workload across multiple microinverters, the lifetime of each inverter can be longer than that of a single central inverter.
  • - Advanced monitoring: The ability to monitor the performance of each panel individually allows for faster detection of problems and more efficient maintenance.
  • - Design flexibility: Microinverters allow for more flexible and scalable solar system designs, as they are not dependent on the specific layout of the panels.
  • - Safety: Microinverters are generally safer in terms of automatic shutdown in case of electrical or safety problems.

However, microinverters can also be more expensive than traditional inverters and may require a more complex installation due to the need to connect each microinverter individually. The choice between microinverters and traditional inverters depends on factors such as system size, budget and the specific conditions of the solar installation.

Which is better, a microinverter or an inverter?

The choice between a micro inverter and a central inverter depends on several factors and the specific needs of your solar power system. Both technologies have their advantages and disadvantages, so it is important to consider several aspects before making a decision. Here are some considerations to help you determine which is best for your situation:

Microinverters:

  • - Individual optimisation: Microinverters optimise the performance of each solar panel individually, which can improve system efficiency, especially in situations of partial shading or uneven panel orientation.
  • - Advanced monitoring: Most microinverter systems come with real-time monitoring capabilities that allow you to track the performance of each panel individually. This facilitates early problem detection and maintenance.
  • - Scalability: Microinverter systems are often easier to expand, as they are not limited by the capacity of a single central inverter. You can add solar panels more flexibly as your energy consumption increases.
  • - Safety: Microinverters are usually safer in terms of automatic shutdown in case of electrical or safety problems.

Central inverter:

  • - Lower initial cost: Central inverters are usually cheaper than microinverters in terms of initial investment, especially in large systems.
  • - Fewer components: A central inverter system requires fewer components and less wiring, which can simplify installation and reduce labour costs.
  • - Longer lifetime: Central inverters typically have a longer lifetime compared to microinverters, as they are designed to handle larger loads and can last longer.
  • - System-level efficiency: If your solar panel system is not subject to significant shading and has a uniform orientation, a central inverter can operate efficiently at the system level.

In short, there is no definitive answer as to which is best, as it depends on your specific needs and circumstances. If you are looking for panel-level performance optimisation and the ability to closely monitor the performance of your system, microinverters may be a good option. On the other hand, if you are on a tight budget and have a uniform, shadow-free solar panel system, a central inverter may be more suitable. The choice should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis in consultation with a professional solar installer.

How many solar panels does a microinverter support?

The number of solar panels that a microinverter can support depends on the specific model of the microinverter and its rated capacity. Microinverters are designed and manufactured with different power handling capacities, and this capacity is expressed in terms of maximum continuous power (in watts or kilowatts). Therefore, the number of panels a microinverter can support depends on the total power of the solar panels to which it is connected.

To determine how many solar panels a particular microinverter can handle, you should consider the following:

  • - Microinverter power rating: Consult the technical specifications of the specific microinverter you plan to use. These specifications will give you the maximum continuous power that the microinverter can handle. For example, if you have a microinverter with a power rating of 300 watts, this is the maximum power limit it can convert from DC to AC continuously.
  • - Solar panel power rating: Next, you need to know the power rating of your individual solar panels. This information is found on solar panel labels and is usually expressed in watts or kilowatts. For example, if you have solar panels of 300 watts each, and your microinverter is rated at 300 watts, you could connect a single panel to a microinverter.
  • - Calculating the maximum capacity: Divide the rated power of the microinverter by the rated power of the solar panels to determine how many panels can be connected to a single microinverter. For example, if the microinverter is rated at 300 watts and your solar panels are 300 watts each, then you could connect one panel per microinverter.

It is important to follow the microinverter manufacturer's recommendations and adhere to the specified maximum capacities to ensure safe and efficient operation of your solar system. Also note that some makes and models of microinverters may have different capacities, so it is essential to consult the technical specifications of the specific microinverter you plan to use in your solar installation.

When to use microinverters?

Microinverters are a suitable option in a number of situations and may be preferable in certain scenarios. Here are some circumstances in which it is advisable to use microinverters in a solar system:

  • - Shading: If your solar system is subject to partial shading at some point during the day due to trees, buildings or other obstacles, microinverters are an excellent option. Because of their ability to optimise the performance of each panel individually, they minimise the energy loss caused by shade on a specific panel without affecting the performance of the other panels.
  • - Uneven orientation and tilt: When solar panels have different orientations or tilts in the same system, microinverters can be useful. They help maximise the energy output of each panel, regardless of its orientation or tilt.
  • - Easy maintenance: Individual panel monitoring makes it easy to detect problems early or panels that are not working properly, which simplifies maintenance and reduces system downtime.
  • - Scalability: If you plan to expand your solar system in the future, microinverters allow for greater flexibility and scalability, as you can more easily add panels without the need to change a central inverter.
  • - Space constraints: In installations with limited roof space or installation area, microinverters may be more suitable due to their ability to accommodate more compact and efficient system designs.
  • - Aesthetics: If you are concerned about the appearance of your solar system, microinverters may be an attractive option, as they do not require a bulky central inverter and may be less visible in the installation.
  • - Reduced single point of failure: In traditional systems with a central inverter, if the central inverter fails, the entire system can be affected. With microinverters, each panel operates independently, reducing the risk of a system-wide failure.
  • - Regulatory compliance: In some areas or countries, regulations may favour or require the use of microinverters in certain solar applications, such as residential systems.

However, it is important to note that microinverters also have a higher upfront cost per panel compared to central inverters, so it is critical to balance the additional benefits with the available budget and the specific needs of your solar project. The choice of using microinverters or central inverters must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and can depend on several factors, including location, system size and specific installation conditions.